Maritime Museum reveals Porthcurno's place in history

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21 January — 2 February 2009

In a fascinating talk at the Maritime Museum Alan Renton, curator and archivist at Porthcurno Telegraph Museum, reveals Porthcurno’s place in the history of communications.

Maritime Museum reveals Porthcurno's place in history

By the beginning of the 20th century Porthcurno had become the biggest telegraph station in the world. The hub of the "Victorian internet", it linked Britain with its Empire and the wider world through a network of 100,000 miles of cables.

In a fascinating talk at the Maritime Museum on Monday 2 February Alan Renton, curator and archivist at Porthcurno Telegraph Museum, reveals Porthcurno's place in the history of communications and the pivotal role of the cable ships.

Central to the story of telegraph communications are the fleet of cable ships that laid the cables but also recovered them from the deepest sea-bed to make repairs when necessary. The Great Eastern, which was famously used in the laying of the Atlantic cable in 1865, was capable of storing many hundreds of miles of telegraph cable; whilst smaller vessels were required in the laying of ‘shore-ends'.

This illustrated talk, entitled Porthcurno and the Cable Ships, is part of a programme combining a lecture and lunch, which explores different historical and nautical themes. The lecture and set lunch is from 12.30pm on Monday 2 February and costs £12.50. To book your place please call 01326 214546.