Titanic objects staying at the Maritime Museum

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24 June 2009

Following the departure of the hugely successful Titanic Honour and Glory exhibition the Maritime Museum’s Cornwall and the Sea Gallery is making a welcome return, with a number of exciting new developments.

Following the departure of the hugely successful Titanic Honour and Glory exhibition the Maritime Museum's Cornwall and the Sea Gallery is making a welcome return, with a number of exciting new developments.

The Cornwall and the Sea Gallery is one of the more ‘traditional' galleries within the Museum, taking visitors back in time, exploring how Cornish people have made a living from the sea, the sons, enemies and dangers of the seas and how local boats were built and who sailed in them.

Extending its history, stories and objects has always been a core objective for the curatorial team and the Titanic exhibition has allowed them to do this with a new extended feature on emigration.

Following the discovery of new and unseen objects and stories from Cornwall's Titanic history, some of the loans of the items have been extended to tell the story of those who left England for what they thought was a better life in the US.

The Titanic objects on loan include a cup given as a memento by a newly wed couple who chose to stay together on board Titanic rather than be separated and objects loaned by the descendents of the youngest survivor of the sinking who was just nine months old at the time of the disaster.

Among the Titanic additions to the gallery are a number of other objects which includes a painting of the Jane Slade, a Fruit Schooner built by the Slade family in Polruan which inspired Daphne de Maurier's first novel, The Loving Spirit.

A newly acquired model of the SS Arwenack, further history on the D Day landings complete with a GI's Jacket, his certificate of discharge from the US army and the story of his Cornish GI bride, all add a distinctive new level of ‘Cornishness' to this historic gallery.

Jenny Wittamore, Assistant Curator at the Maritime Museum says: "Everyone at the Museum is delighted that we have been able to extend the loans on some of the Cornish objects from the Titanic exhibition and enhance our Cornwall and the Sea gallery. Many of the Cornish people on board Titanic were headed for a new life in the United States, so their stories fit in perfectly with our display about Cornish emigration."

So, if you missed the Titanic exhibition but still want to see some of the very rare objects that have never been seen before, then now is your chance in the all new and enhanced Cornwall and the Sea gallery.

The Cornwall and the Sea Gallery at the National Maritime Museum Cornwall re-opens on Saturday 4 July.