Guest Blog: A circular walk around the Roseland Peninsula Guest Blog: A circular walk around the Roseland Peninsula Guest Blog: A circular walk around the Roseland Peninsula Guest Blog: A circular walk around the Roseland Peninsula

Guest Blog: A circular walk around the Roseland Peninsula

25 March

This months guest blog comes from Cream Cornwall...

With warmer days on the horizon you might be starting to plan your next Cornish adventure. We wanted to share another one of our favourite walks and this one can be part of a wonderful day out exploring Falmouth, St Mawes, and the Roseland peninsula.

 

A couple of things! Before you leave the house you'll want to make sure that you've got comfortable walking shoes, a backpack to carry some food and plenty of water, and perhaps a hat and sun cream if it's looking decidedly sunny. If you have a four legged furry friend then this walk is a great one for them too; doggies are very welcome to travel with Fal River ferries.

The starting point is from Falmouth where you want to take the ferry to St Mawes. Conveniently, Fal River provides two ferries that run to St Mawes, so depending on where you've parked in town you can take the one that's closer to you! One runs from the Prince of Wales pier, and the other from Customs House Quay, at the other end of Falmouth town.

 

When you get your ticket make sure you ask one of the friendly Fal River staff members for a St Mawes and Place Ferry combo . This means you won't have to worry about buying any other tickets for the rest of the day.

The twenty minute ferry ride from Falmouth to St Mawes passes quickly. From the sights of the busy working Pendennis shipyard, the comings and goings of the yachts and boats within the harbour, to the oggling of some of the amazing houses that line the coast, you'll see plenty of sights to keep you entertained.

Once you arrive in St Mawes you'll want to make sure you're set up for exploring the Roseland. If you're looking to add a pasty to your supplies then look no further than St Mawes bakery. They're right on the quay and have a selection of goodies. You've also got De Bara bakery just on the parade next to the harbour. They also have a wide selection of sweet treats and good coffee, if you're looking to refuel.

St Mawes is a beautiful village and, depending on your schedule, you might like to walk up to St Mawes castle and look around, or perhaps you'd prefer to sit down and have a leisurely morning tea or coffee at the iconic Tresanton or Idle Rocks hotel. We adore both spots and can sometimes be found at either one planning our next collection over a delicious lunch.

The next part of the journey is from St Mawes to Place, where you'll start exploring the Roseland peninsula, and in particular St Anthony Head where you'll have unparalleled views across Falmouth harbour. Head back to St Mawes harbour to board the Place ferry. This ferry will remind you of yesteryear as it only holds 12 people and takes you past unspoilt coastline. It's easy to forget that you're in the 21st century whilst pootling past. If you have any questions about the area or about what else you should see, then you'll find that your ferry captain is a fountain of knowledge and they're always happy to help.

When you arrive at Place jetty you need to walk up the lane past Place House. This unusual house was built in 1861 by Sir Thomas Spry. It's unusual in that it was built in

the style of a French chateau, and so isn't quite what you'd expect in this Cornish stronghold.

Follow the Southwest footpath to start the 4.5 mile walk and experience some of what we think is the most inspiring Cornish landscape.

The path will take you past the most amazing 12th century church that should be explored if you have the time.

 From here continue walking, taking in the incredible views back over to St Mawes and of Falmouth harbour. It's clear why 'creatives' from around the world find this spot so inspirational. The colours of the water and the land around you, along with a sense that things have remained the same in this place for hundreds of years makes it very special. For us, it’s also the act of walking that helps us to come up with our best ideas. Such a simple thing, but walking gives the mind time to breathe and process. It helps to wash away the banal bits that tend to clog up our thoughts and give us a fresh perspective.

It might be a good time to have your picnic before you reach St Anthony Head. We like setting up near Little and Great Molunan beach. If you're looking to make an occasion of it then we love taking our Coral Rays picnic blanket. It doesn't take much to turn your picnic into a beautiful scene. Perhaps, if you're feeling brave, you might have a paddle or dip your toes into the clear water. 

Keep following the path, but you'll need to leave it to explore St Anthony Head, a National Trust property, and the lighthouse. There's a variety of military remnants around the area left over from 1895 when fortifications were built to protect the estuary of the River Fal. There's a toposcope beside the gun emplacement to help you find landmarks such as the Manacles.

When you've finished you simply need to re-join the path and continue walking around the peninsula. When you come to Zone Point you'll have incredible views of Nare Head and if you look North you might be able to see the 'White Alps' of the china clay country around St Austell. We love the sense of space here. There's nothing quite like the feeling of the wind and sun on your face as you amble along.

To complete this circular walk and head back to the ferry you need to take the path to the road before you get to Porthmellin Head. Turn left and then right to walk through the hamlet of Bohortha. Continue walking straight on and you'll come out at the bottom of the lane next to where the ferry arrives and departs.

The Place ferry runs every 30 minutes between April to October, so you'll never have to wait long for a return ferry. We hope you love this walk as much as us. 

Rebecca and Allison X